Left: Jean Paul Gaultier and Right: Ormond Gigli, Girls in the Windows, 1960

Here are some art and fashion comparisons that came out of Paris from last fall… Looking forawrd to see what is to come for Fall/Winter 2014!

Left: Celine and Right: Franz West, Uncle Chairs

Left: Balenciaga and Right: Alberto Burri, Cretto G2, 1975

Left: Chanel and Right: Wassily Kandinsky, Il Blau, 1925

Left: Comme des Garcons Fall/Winter 2013 and Right: Barry McGee, Unittiled, 2012

Balmain Spring/Summer 2014

A new batch of campaigns has hit print which means its time for The Art of… Advertising – Spring/Summer 2014 edition. Last season top honors went to Dior for recreating Edouard Manet’s 1863 masterpiece, Luncheon on the Grass, while spring belongs to Balmain for the obvious ode to the late Jean Pierre Raynaud. Marc’s ultimate Louis Vuitton collection was photographed on his favorite muses in what appeared to be an Irving Penn-esque take on Picasso’s Blue Period while La Perla took a cue from another great, Horst P. Horst, and referenced his most famous corset image. The Missoni ads used a similar backdrop as this season’s Chloe runway show, but rather an orange and blue version of Anish Kapoor’s circular sky plates. A season of advertisements would not be complete without two of fashion’s favorite references, George Longo and Louise Dahl-Wolfe. Saint Laurent and Dior Beauty, respectively, filled the void this season with strikingly obvious odes. Last but not least, my favorite campaign goes to Prada who took the concept of Thomas Struth’s family portraits to greater heights. I want to be part of Miuccia’s wacky, colorful, gem-encrusted art family.

And while the references may not have been as obvious as the campaigns pictured above and below, honorable mention goes to Kenzo, Miu Miu, Dior and Alexander McQueen. The Kenzo campaign was yet again done in collaboration with Toilet Paper Magazine and art directed by the amazing Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari. Miu Miu’s girls this season gave off an Egon Schiele vibe while the Dior ads placed models atop a sea of Magritte-like clouds. Lastly, the McQueen ads were shot by Steven Klein and had Kate the Great posing with a matching Barbie which brought the concept of Laurie Simmons’ doll series to a new level. Excited to see what is to come of the fall 2014 shows and subsequent campaigns!

Installation by Jean Pierre Raynaud

Louis Vuitton Spring/Summer 2014

Works by Pablo Picasso

Left: work by Horst P. Horst and Right: La Perla Spring/Summer 2014 campaign

Missoni Spring/Summer 2014

Works by Anish Kapoor

Saint Laurent Spring/Summer 2014

Left: Louise Dahl-Wolfe and Christian Dior Beauty Campaign

Portraits by Thomas Struth

Prada Spring/Summer 2014

Prada Spring/Summer 2014

VOSSAlexander McQueen Spring/Summer 2001

In the spirit of Throwback Thursdays, Thursdays on Minnie Muse are now devoted to rediscovering some of fashion’s favorite collections in a series of posts dubbed The Vault. It only feels right to launch The Vault with VOSS, the spring/summer 2001 show by the king of the runway, Alexander McQueen.

VOSS was the collection where some of McQueen’s most celebrated looks and mind-blowing accessories made their runway debut; from the razor-clam dress and mussel shell pieces to the red and black feather and medical slide dress. Not to mention, some key elements of the collection – menswear, feathers, and exaggerated silhouettes – are as relevant today as they were when they walked the runway in 2000. Even the staging has been copied; such was the case at Prabal Gurung’s spring 2014 runway show where models were presented inside a transparent, box-like structure that was strikingly similar to the setup of VOSS. A fashion lovers fantasy world.

VOSSAlexander McQueen Spring/Summer 2001

VOSSAlexander McQueen Spring/Summer 2001

VOSSAlexander McQueen Spring/Summer 2001

VOSSAlexander McQueen Spring/Summer 2001

Top: Prabal Gurung Spring/Summer 2014 and Bottom: Alexander McQueen Spring/Summer 2001

J.W.Anderson Fall/Winter 2013 x Callum Innes

Wednesday’s are now for one of my favorite features called Art on the Runway which originated on Minnie Muse last year and has since begun calling W Magazine Online home! I love spotting art references in the new runway collections each season. In honor of the fall/winter 2014 London shows here are some of my favorite unpublished comparisons from last fall. Just wrapping up work on the New York collections… Exciting things to come!

Left: Christopher Kane Fall/Winter 2013 and Right: Untitled, 1995 by Chiyu Uemae

Left: House of Holland Fall/Winter 2013 and Right: Maquette for Smoking Cigarette, 1982 by Tom Wesselmann

Left: Mary Katrantzou Fall/Winter 2013 and Right: All Matters of Mind Equal one Violet, 2011 by David Benjamin Sherry

Tom Ford Fall/Winter 2013 and Right: A Little Taste Outside of Love, 2007 by Mickalene Thomas

Dior Spring/Summer 2014

I have returned to blogging with one of my favorite posts from last season – The Art of… A Runway Show. The spring/summer 2014 collections were filled with art references both in looks presented and the runway backdrops. Christian Dior, once again, makes the list thanks to Raf Simon’s enchanted secret garden with flowers hanging in a Hew Locke-fashion. Hedi Slimane brightened up the Saint Laurent runway with a series of suspended light sculptures similar in style to the work of artist Ivan Navarro. Dries Van Noten and Rodarte paid homage to my two favorite minimalists, Donald Judd and Dan Flavin, respectively. Dries lined his runway with a series of Judd-esque Stacks while Kate and Laura took a cue from their spring/summer 2013 show and scattered the runway, yet again, with Flavin’s neon light beams. Ricardo Tisci staged a car crash on the Givenchy runway similar to the work Short Cut, 2003, by Elmgreen and Dragset. Above the runway at Chloe hung a single gold inverted plate almost identical to Untitled, 2012, by Anish Kapoor while photos from Anya Hindmarch’s Cirque du Soleil-inspired show resembled James Rosenquist’s Multiple Universe works from 2012. Both Alexander Wang and Felipe Oliveira Baptista for Lacoste created backdrops mimicking Sol Lewitt’s Costruzione Cubica, 1971.

Lastly, this wouldn’t be a proper spring/summer 2014 art and fashion post without mentioning Prada and Chanel. This season Miuccia Prada commissioned street artists and illustrators to provide designs for the both the clothing and accessories as well as runway backdrop for Prada while at Chanel Karl Lagerfeld constructed his very own high fashion art gallery within the walls of the Grand Palais.

Excited to see who chooses an artistic setting to compliment the fall/winter 2014 collections in the weeks to come!

Left: Christian Dior Spring/Summer 2014 and Right: artwork by Hew Locke

Saint Laurent Spring/Summer 2014

Work by Ivan Navarro

Left: Dries Van Noten Spring/Summer 2014 and Right: work by Donald Judd

Left: Rodarte Spring/Summer 2014 and Right: work by Dan Flavin

Right: Givenchy Spring/Summer 2014 and Right: Short Cut, 2003 by Elmgreen and Dragset

Left: Chloe Spring/Summer 2014 and Right: Untitled, 2012, by Anish Kapoor

Left and Right: Anya Hindmarch Spring/Summer 2014 and Middle: James Rosenquist, 2012

Left: Alexander Wang Spring/Summer 2014 and Right: Lacoste Spring/Summer 2014

Sol Lewitt, Costruzione Cubica, 1971

Prada Spring/Summer 2014

Chanel Spring/Summer 2014

Miu Miu Spring/Summer 2011 and Roy Lichtenstein’s Wall Explosion II, 1965

While the spring/summer 2014 fashion season is well underway, nothing shown thus far is sure to stick in consumers’ minds for the next six months until the collections are available for purchase.

For fall 2013, top honors went to Tom Ford’s explosive appliqués that, regardless of their commercial appeal, made quite the impact. The buzz surrounding Mr.Ford’s fall collection could have been in part due to it being his first full-scale runway show since his return to womenswear, however his designs impressed nonetheless. The evening looks, complete with Lichtenstein-eque explosions, are featured in the Tom Ford fall ad campaign and have graced the pages of countless high fashion editorials since their runway debut. Looking back, it was Miuccia Prada who used a similar in-your-face approach to ready-to-wear for spring/summer 2011 with her firecracker leather skirts and jackets at Miu Miu (pictured above).

Tom Ford Fall/Winter 2013 Advertisement

Soon after, Phillip Lim made an even more obvious ode to Lichtenstein for pre-fall 2012, mimicking the pop artist’s famous style similar to how Spanish pop art team, Equipo Cronica, has done in the past.

3.1 Phillip Lim Pre-Fall 2012 and Equipo Cronica’s Guernica, 1971

Chanel Fall/Winter 2009 Couture

For fall/winter 2009 couture, Karl Lagerfeld took a more abstract approach to fireworks and explosions at Chanel. Two standout looks from the collection bared striking similarities to the works by artists Wassily Kandinsky and Robert Delaunay; entitled Squares with Concentric Circles, 1913, and Le Premier Disque, 134 cm, 52.7 inches, 1912-13, respectively.

Left: Squares with Concentric Circles, 1913 by Wassily Kandinsky and Right: Le Premier Disque, 134 cm, 52.7 inches, 1912-13 by Robert Delaunay

Lastly, no reference to explosive fashion would be complete without mentioning Christopher Kane’s 2010 resort collection. The atomic bomb dresses and separates were unforgettable and almost identical to images in Robert Longo’s series of charcoal, bomb drawings, The Sickness of Reason.

No matter what the season – fall, resort, spring or pre-fall – ready-to-wear or couture, designers are more than capable of making an impact. Now it is your turn spring/summer 2014, wow us.

Christopher Kane Resort 2010 and Atomic Bomb charcoal drawing by Robert Longo

Polaroids by Andy Warhol, clockwise from top left: Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Mapplethorpe, Julian Schnabel, Robert Rauschenberg, Jean Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring

Artists across multiple mediums have explored portraiture at points in their careers. The subjects depicted in such works often say as much as the resulting image. Just as designers find inspiration in their contemporaries, artists oftentimes look towards each other for stimulation.

Andy Warhol’s famous Polaroids have captured fellow creative’s from Roy Lichtenstein to Basquiat while Julian Schnabel has in turn painted Warhol in a dark, slightly abstract portrait. Robert Mapplethorpe was a favorite subject of his contemporaries while he himself found inspiration in fellow artists from Warhol and Keith Haring to Cindy Sherman. Ms.Sherman has recently been a subject for Chuck Close, while in the past Chuck was brought to life on canvas by painter Eric Fischl. David Hockney has been painted by both Elizabeth Peyton and Lucien Freud, while one of my favorite photographers, Thomas Struth, captured Gerhard Richter with his wife and children in a family portrait. Modern pop-artist Darcel Disappoints has made caricatures of everyone from Aurel Schmidt to Jeff Koons while KAWS was a subject of Takashi Murakami’s recent series of portraits. The ever-expanding list begs the question of who will be next…

From left: Andy Warhol, Cindy Sherman and Keith Haring all by Robert Mapplethorpe

Andy Warhol by Julian Schnabel

Gerhard Richter and family by Thomas Struth

Cindy Sherman by Chuck Close

Left: David Hockney by Lucian Freud and right: Chuck Close by Eric Fischl

Robert Mapplethorpe and David Hockney by Elizabeth Peyton

Various artists by Darcel Disappoints

JR by Liu Bolin

KAWS by Takashi Murakami

Clockwise from top left: Andy Warhol, Jean Michel Basquiat, Julian Schnabel, Chuck Close, Takashi Murakami and Pablo Picasso all by Jacques Pelissier

Double Take

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Left: Gerhard Richter and Right: Ellsworth Kelly

Just as designers find inspiration in the work of their contemporaries (i.e. Seen it Be-Tore) artists oftentimes adopt similar styles to one another; in some cases on purpose, others, but happenchance. There will always be the Elaine Sturtevant’s and Richard Pettibone’s of the world who have made a living off of pure imitation, but in most cases, art is about reinvention; take Aaron Young’s trademark Brice Marden-esque style (pictured below), for example. Young’s energetic lines, however, are the products of motorcycle tires and various other wheeled vehicles while Marden’s were merely a brush and paint on canvas. Now, the real question is how artists in the future will modernize the work of today.

Left: Brice Marden and Right: Aaron Young

Left: Andy Warhol and Right: Richard Pettibone

Top: Sol LeWitt and Bottom: Frank Stella

Left: Vik Muniz and Right: Kyle Bean

Left: David Salle and Right: James Rosenquist

Left: Roy Lichtenstein and Right: Elaine Sturtevant

Left: Louise Bourgeois and Right: Pino Piscali

Left: Thomas Ruff and Right: Matti Braun

Left: Kenneth Noland and Right: Gary Lang

Top: Claes Oldenburg and Bottom: Wayne Thiebaud

From Left: Narciso Rodriguez, Erdem, Christian Dior and Louis Vuitton Pre-Fall 2013

The fall 2013 shopping season is well under way. Collections shown almost six months ago are finally hitting stores and available for purchase. In an effort to re-familiarize myself with pre-fall I have been flipping through shows style.com and noticed a pattern amongst the collections. Designers from Narciso Rodriguez to Erdem as well as Parisian houses like Louis Vuitton and Christian Dior showed multiple, if not all, of their 2013 pre-fall looks in pairs.

Dolce & Gabbana, Viktor & Rolf and Valentino’s Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli

This latest pre-fall development is hardly the first time the fashion world has experienced the impact of a twosome. Could this trend have come about as a result of the continuing success of designer pairs from Dolce & Gabbana and Viktor & Rolf, to Valentino’s Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli? Just this past June the CFDA awards for womenswear designer of the year and the Swarovski award for womenswear were presented to American duos Proenza Shoulder and Suno, respectively, and in 2012 Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen were awarded top honors for The Row.

John Galliano spring/summer 2006 and Chanel spring/summer 2013 couture

The art world, however, recognized the power of pairs far before John Galliano sent obscure couples down the runway for his namesake spring/summer 2006 ready-to-wear show and prior to Lagerfeld’s double bride finale for Chanel spring/summer 2013 couture.

Left: Dan Flavin & Donald Judd and right: Peter Fischli & David Weiss

Artists such as Dan Flavin and Donald Judd as well as Peter Fischli & David Weiss began collaborating in the 1970s while modern day duos from Elmgreen and Dragset to Kelley Walker and Wade Guyton have made names for themselves as twosomes.

Left: Elmgreen & Dragset and right: Wade Guyton and Kelley Walker

Countless solo artists have explored the concept of duality within their personal work. One of photographer Diane Arbus’ most celebrated images – Identical Twins, Roselle, New Jersey, 1967 – famously depicts identical young females and by happenchance began a cultural revolution; is it said that the pair were the inspiration behind the twins in Stanley Kubrick’s surrealist horror film, The Shining. Arbus herself even worked in collaboration with her husband, Allan, although he is rarely mentioned.

Identical Twins, Roselle, New Jersey, 1967 and twins from The Shining

Likewise, more contemporary female photographers, from Sarah Jones to Cindy Sherman, have embraced twosomes in their individual work; the latter elevated her trademark self-portraits during the photo-shop revolution of the early 2000’s and began appearing multiple times in one image.

Left: work by Sarah Jones and right: work by Cindy Sherman

Regardless of seasonal trends, fashion and art duos continue to prove themselves unstoppable.

Dior Fall/Winter 2013

August is underway meaning that any day now September fashion issues the size of telephone books will be hitting newsstands. Last year I shed light on editorial content vs. ad pages and, while I can imagine 2013 will be much of the same, something excites me about what I have seen thus far on the fall/winter ad circuit. More designers have taken inspiration from art for their latest set of campaigns.

For starters, Inez and Vinoodh captured Raf Simmons’ fall 2013 collection for Dior and one image in particular (pictured above) was a direct reference to Edouard Manet’s 1863 masterpiece, Luncheon on the Grass (below).

Edouard Manet, Luncheon on the Grass, 1863

While Dior took inspiration from the past, at KENZO, Carol Lim and Huberto Leon enlisted the help of present-day artist Maurizio Cattelan to think up a fantastic, surrealist-inspired campaign.

Left: Maurizio Cattelan’s highline billboard and Right: KENZO Fall/Winter 2013

KENZO Fall/Winter 2013

Left: Robert Longo image and Right: McQ Fall/Winter 2013

Similarly, one of fashion’s ‘go-to’ artists, Robert Longo, is once again invading fashion magazines by way of the McQ campaign (above). In the past, Lanvin showed Longo-inspired images for spring/summer 2010 while the following season the entire Bottega Veneta campaign was shot Longo-style.

Lanvin Spring/Summer 2010

Bottega Veneta Fall/Winter 2010

In the past, fashion houses have partnered with artists to produce original editorial content. Cindy Sherman is always the premier example of the intersection of art and fashion; take her post card series for Comme des Garçons in 1994 or her Marc Jacobs advertisements in 2006. Rather than a brand using an artist to promote a collaboration between the two creative forces, it is most intriguing when designers seek out artists to highlight their existing products.

Tom Ford Fall/Winter 2007 by Marilyn Minter

Taking this philosophy and looking back at past year’s fashion advertisements, Tom Ford’s fall/winter 2007 campaign by Marilyn Minter immediately comes to mind. The images represented the Tom Ford brand through the eyes of Marilyn Minter – pure genius.

Tom Ford Fall/Winter 2007 by Marilyn Minter

Left: Rene Magritte, The False Mirror, 1928 and Right: Diane Von Furstenberg

Just last year Diane Von Furstenberg showed a series of surrealist ads for spring/summer 2012 with countless references to the work of Salvador Dali and Rene Magritte (above).

All work by Martin Munkacsi

Last but not least, my favorite ode to an artist was Prada’s spring/summer 2001 ad campaign inspired by the amazing Martin Munkacsi (the same man who captured the puddle jumper in 1934, well before Avadon). Munkacsi was famous for his high-energy, identifiable images when, at the time, almost all fashion photographs were being shot on a large format camera inside a studio. His series of beach photographs from the late 1920’s to early 1930’s are still some of his most celebrated to date and served as the inspiration behind Ms.Prada’s spring/summer campaign.

Prada Spring/Summer 2001

Prada Spring/Summer 2001

Prada Spring/Summer 2001