Left: Jean Paul Gaultier and Right: Ormond Gigli, Girls in the Windows, 1960

Here are some art and fashion comparisons that came out of Paris from last fall… Looking forawrd to see what is to come for Fall/Winter 2014!

Left: Celine and Right: Franz West, Uncle Chairs

Left: Balenciaga and Right: Alberto Burri, Cretto G2, 1975

Left: Chanel and Right: Wassily Kandinsky, Il Blau, 1925

Left: Comme des Garcons Fall/Winter 2013 and Right: Barry McGee, Unittiled, 2012

Balmain Spring/Summer 2014

A new batch of campaigns has hit print which means its time for The Art of… Advertising – Spring/Summer 2014 edition. Last season top honors went to Dior for recreating Edouard Manet’s 1863 masterpiece, Luncheon on the Grass, while spring belongs to Balmain for the obvious ode to the late Jean Pierre Raynaud. Marc’s ultimate Louis Vuitton collection was photographed on his favorite muses in what appeared to be an Irving Penn-esque take on Picasso’s Blue Period while La Perla took a cue from another great, Horst P. Horst, and referenced his most famous corset image. The Missoni ads used a similar backdrop as this season’s Chloe runway show, but rather an orange and blue version of Anish Kapoor’s circular sky plates. A season of advertisements would not be complete without two of fashion’s favorite references, George Longo and Louise Dahl-Wolfe. Saint Laurent and Dior Beauty, respectively, filled the void this season with strikingly obvious odes. Last but not least, my favorite campaign goes to Prada who took the concept of Thomas Struth’s family portraits to greater heights. I want to be part of Miuccia’s wacky, colorful, gem-encrusted art family.

And while the references may not have been as obvious as the campaigns pictured above and below, honorable mention goes to Kenzo, Miu Miu, Dior and Alexander McQueen. The Kenzo campaign was yet again done in collaboration with Toilet Paper Magazine and art directed by the amazing Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari. Miu Miu’s girls this season gave off an Egon Schiele vibe while the Dior ads placed models atop a sea of Magritte-like clouds. Lastly, the McQueen ads were shot by Steven Klein and had Kate the Great posing with a matching Barbie which brought the concept of Laurie Simmons’ doll series to a new level. Excited to see what is to come of the fall 2014 shows and subsequent campaigns!

Installation by Jean Pierre Raynaud

Louis Vuitton Spring/Summer 2014

Works by Pablo Picasso

Left: work by Horst P. Horst and Right: La Perla Spring/Summer 2014 campaign

Missoni Spring/Summer 2014

Works by Anish Kapoor

Saint Laurent Spring/Summer 2014

Left: Louise Dahl-Wolfe and Christian Dior Beauty Campaign

Portraits by Thomas Struth

Prada Spring/Summer 2014

Prada Spring/Summer 2014

Miu Miu Spring/Summer 2011 and Roy Lichtenstein’s Wall Explosion II, 1965

While the spring/summer 2014 fashion season is well underway, nothing shown thus far is sure to stick in consumers’ minds for the next six months until the collections are available for purchase.

For fall 2013, top honors went to Tom Ford’s explosive appliqués that, regardless of their commercial appeal, made quite the impact. The buzz surrounding Mr.Ford’s fall collection could have been in part due to it being his first full-scale runway show since his return to womenswear, however his designs impressed nonetheless. The evening looks, complete with Lichtenstein-eque explosions, are featured in the Tom Ford fall ad campaign and have graced the pages of countless high fashion editorials since their runway debut. Looking back, it was Miuccia Prada who used a similar in-your-face approach to ready-to-wear for spring/summer 2011 with her firecracker leather skirts and jackets at Miu Miu (pictured above).

Tom Ford Fall/Winter 2013 Advertisement

Soon after, Phillip Lim made an even more obvious ode to Lichtenstein for pre-fall 2012, mimicking the pop artist’s famous style similar to how Spanish pop art team, Equipo Cronica, has done in the past.

3.1 Phillip Lim Pre-Fall 2012 and Equipo Cronica’s Guernica, 1971

Chanel Fall/Winter 2009 Couture

For fall/winter 2009 couture, Karl Lagerfeld took a more abstract approach to fireworks and explosions at Chanel. Two standout looks from the collection bared striking similarities to the works by artists Wassily Kandinsky and Robert Delaunay; entitled Squares with Concentric Circles, 1913, and Le Premier Disque, 134 cm, 52.7 inches, 1912-13, respectively.

Left: Squares with Concentric Circles, 1913 by Wassily Kandinsky and Right: Le Premier Disque, 134 cm, 52.7 inches, 1912-13 by Robert Delaunay

Lastly, no reference to explosive fashion would be complete without mentioning Christopher Kane’s 2010 resort collection. The atomic bomb dresses and separates were unforgettable and almost identical to images in Robert Longo’s series of charcoal, bomb drawings, The Sickness of Reason.

No matter what the season – fall, resort, spring or pre-fall – ready-to-wear or couture, designers are more than capable of making an impact. Now it is your turn spring/summer 2014, wow us.

Christopher Kane Resort 2010 and Atomic Bomb charcoal drawing by Robert Longo

Dior Fall/Winter 2013

August is underway meaning that any day now September fashion issues the size of telephone books will be hitting newsstands. Last year I shed light on editorial content vs. ad pages and, while I can imagine 2013 will be much of the same, something excites me about what I have seen thus far on the fall/winter ad circuit. More designers have taken inspiration from art for their latest set of campaigns.

For starters, Inez and Vinoodh captured Raf Simmons’ fall 2013 collection for Dior and one image in particular (pictured above) was a direct reference to Edouard Manet’s 1863 masterpiece, Luncheon on the Grass (below).

Edouard Manet, Luncheon on the Grass, 1863

While Dior took inspiration from the past, at KENZO, Carol Lim and Huberto Leon enlisted the help of present-day artist Maurizio Cattelan to think up a fantastic, surrealist-inspired campaign.

Left: Maurizio Cattelan’s highline billboard and Right: KENZO Fall/Winter 2013

KENZO Fall/Winter 2013

Left: Robert Longo image and Right: McQ Fall/Winter 2013

Similarly, one of fashion’s ‘go-to’ artists, Robert Longo, is once again invading fashion magazines by way of the McQ campaign (above). In the past, Lanvin showed Longo-inspired images for spring/summer 2010 while the following season the entire Bottega Veneta campaign was shot Longo-style.

Lanvin Spring/Summer 2010

Bottega Veneta Fall/Winter 2010

In the past, fashion houses have partnered with artists to produce original editorial content. Cindy Sherman is always the premier example of the intersection of art and fashion; take her post card series for Comme des Garçons in 1994 or her Marc Jacobs advertisements in 2006. Rather than a brand using an artist to promote a collaboration between the two creative forces, it is most intriguing when designers seek out artists to highlight their existing products.

Tom Ford Fall/Winter 2007 by Marilyn Minter

Taking this philosophy and looking back at past year’s fashion advertisements, Tom Ford’s fall/winter 2007 campaign by Marilyn Minter immediately comes to mind. The images represented the Tom Ford brand through the eyes of Marilyn Minter – pure genius.

Tom Ford Fall/Winter 2007 by Marilyn Minter

Left: Rene Magritte, The False Mirror, 1928 and Right: Diane Von Furstenberg

Just last year Diane Von Furstenberg showed a series of surrealist ads for spring/summer 2012 with countless references to the work of Salvador Dali and Rene Magritte (above).

All work by Martin Munkacsi

Last but not least, my favorite ode to an artist was Prada’s spring/summer 2001 ad campaign inspired by the amazing Martin Munkacsi (the same man who captured the puddle jumper in 1934, well before Avadon). Munkacsi was famous for his high-energy, identifiable images when, at the time, almost all fashion photographs were being shot on a large format camera inside a studio. His series of beach photographs from the late 1920’s to early 1930’s are still some of his most celebrated to date and served as the inspiration behind Ms.Prada’s spring/summer campaign.

Prada Spring/Summer 2001

Prada Spring/Summer 2001

Prada Spring/Summer 2001

Art by Kehinde Wiley, inspired by Givenchy Fall/Winter 2013

Looking back at the Minnie Muse archive, one of my all-time favorite posts to date is Between The Lines from April 2012. It was through the Between The Lines coloring book that I was first introduced to the unbelievable organization RxArt all while rediscovering one of my favorite pastimes as a child, coloring. This year, I once again flipped through the pages of Between The Lines and chose different works to color using the fall/winter 2013 collections as my inspiration. My self-constructed fantasy land includes Givenchy’s FW13 runway hair in form of a baseball cap, a Rodarte rose garden and tie-dye sky, a Jeremy Scott-patterned Giraffe and some sultry/gothic Thom Browne-inspired Murakami flowers. What a world it would be…

Art by Marc Swanson, inspired by Miu Miu Fall/Winter 2013

Art by Mike Bayne, inspired by Rodarte Fall/Winter 2013

Art by Tom Slaughter, inspired by Jeremy Scott Fall/Winter 2013

Art by Ben Jones, inspired by Fendi Fall/Winter 2013


Art by Nicholas Digenova, inspired by Comme des Garçons Fall/Winter 2013


Art by Takashi Murakami, inspired by Thom Browne Fall/Winter 2013

Alexander McQueen FW 2012 ready-to-wear and Giambattista Valli FW 2013 Couture

Is imitation truly the highest form of flattery? Or is it merely a lack of originality? Another couture season has come and gone, this time, with countless designers referencing their contemporaries in a big way. It wasn’t a pattern here or appliqué there, however many houses took direct inspiration from the past, similar to how Joseph Altuzarra famously paid homage to Tom Ford’s fall/winter 2003 ready-to-wear Gucci show for fall/winter 2010. Looking at this most recent couture season, Raf Simons’ global collection for Dior showed a few undeniable similarities to Pheobe Philo’s FW 2012 collection for Céline while Giambattista Valli also looked to FW ’12 and mimicked much of what Sarah Burton showed that season at Alexander McQueen. The first show of the week, Versace, relied on classic underpinnings to serve as the basis on a majority of the looks much like Jason Wu did for spring/summer 2013 and this season, Jean Paul Gaultier sent his bride down in the runway in a gown almost identical to the final few looks in Viktor & Rolf’s spring/summer 2011 show. Similarly, the Dutch duo made subtle references to past collections by the equally avant-garde Rei Kawakubo for their premier couture presentation. Seeing as how this season marked the return of the house of Schiaparelli, maybe designers took that as their cue to make this couture season all about taking something old and making it new again.

Céline FW 2012 ready-to-wear and Christian Dior FW 2013 Couture

Céline FW 2012 ready-to-wear and Christian Dior FW 2013 Couture

Alexander McQueen FW 2012 ready-to-wear and Giambattista Valli FW 2013 Couture

Alexander McQueen FW 2012 ready-to-wear and Giambattista Valli FW 2013 Couture

Viktor & Rolf SS 2011 ready-to-wear and Jean Paul Gaultier FW 2013 Couture

Jason Wu SS 2013 ready-to-wear and Versace FW 2013 Couture

Comme des Garçons FW 2010 ready-to-wear and Viktor & Rolf FW 2013 Couture

From Left: Red Morning, Sebastian and Trailhead all work by Alison Elizabeth Taylor

The second artist in my three-part lead up to Wednesday’s Brooklyn Artist Ball is Alison Elizabeth Taylor. Alison, like Njideka Akunyilli, is designing a table for the evening inspired by the “encyclopedic collection of the Brooklyn Museum.” She will be, “Riffing on various artworks, by abstracting details and fragments into minimal contours and forms.” Then, incorporating her trademark style, she will, “recreate them in marquetry, a medium that usually appears in a museum as a decorative flourish on a princely piece of furniture, in this installation it will be used to interpret a variety of works from many different cultures and eras into a common visual language.” Her admiration for the diversity of the museum’s collection is evident in her well thought-out design and inclusion of others’ works as part of her own.

Oftentimes the most refreshing, forward thinking designs have classical elements – take the fashion world’s revisiting of the single-sole pump, longer hemlines and a more tailored take on feminism; i.e. The New Look-esque construction as shown by Raf Simons at Dior. Just as Ms.Taylor’s use of a classic technique like marquetry helps in creating a unified vision across each of her projects, there are designers who utilize classics season after season to produce a collection that ultimately looks modern and fresh. For fall 2013 Belstaff, The Row and Hermès all utilized classic construction and shapes to produce collections that felt remarkable modern.

First, Belstaff has resurrected their four-pocket jacket in a big way, showing that the classic design has universal appeal for both men and women. Their fall 2013 show was all about elevating staples through texture, color and minute modifications.

Belstaff Fall/Winter 2013

Although The Row hasn’t yet amassed an archive similar in scale Belstaff, Mary-Kate and Ashley utilized the same classic tailoring techniques that their clothes will undoubtedly inspire a few years down the line. They challenged themselves in construction of common shapes like the blazer as well as Asian-inspired cuts that have found their way into their collections the past few seasons.

The Row Fall/Winter 2013

Lastly, Hèrmes – one of my favorite Fall/Winter 2013 shows – a house that specializes leather goods, utilized their trademark skin in every possible way on the runway. Hèrmes designer Christophe Lemaire looked to the brand’s history as masters of cut and craftsmanship to put out one of the most modern looking collections of the Fall/Winter 2013 season.

Hermès Fall/Winter 2013

Work by Njideka Akunyili

The first participating artist in my three-part table series leading up to the Brooklyn Artist Ball is Njideka Akunyili.

I was initially attracted to Njideka’s work because of its collage-like imagery. Her ability to mix patterns and images all while putting a strong focus on a single color-way gives her work an added dimension. Her creative process is an extensive one, often, “Beginning each piece from one of such varied points of inspiration, [she] approaches different facets of themes [she] has been investigating for several years. Next, [she] does multiple initial sketches to plan the overall compositional shapes, rhythm, value and colors of the piece.”

The most defining characteristic of her work is, “The synergy between its form and content. [She] transfers photographic images of Nigeria into larger painted compositions in order to create a space that fluctuates between traditional Western perspectival illusion and a flat picture plane. This flux recapitulates the phenomenon of syncretism and the people who live in this third space of constant negotiation and fluidity.”

Her tremendous support of the Brooklyn Museum is evident through her involvement in the event and the high praises she gives the art institution. In her words, “It is a museum that has something for everyone and speaks to the diversity of Brooklyn, as evidenced by its exhibition Connecting Cultures: A World in Brooklyn. The museum does a laudable job of engaging and celebrating Brooklyn artists through the Raw/Cooked program, the recent Go Brooklyn open studios and the Artist Ball.” The constant mix of iconic pieces by both young and established artists is the perfect compliment to Njideka’s continuous efforts to incorporate elements that are both old and new into her work.

Like the very museum she is honoring next Wednesday, Njideka’s table design for the evening blurs the line between the past and present while breaking down cultural boundaries. Her table, Compound Transplant, “Was inspired by a striking display of plastic containers for sale along the side of a highway in Eastern Nigeria [… and] evokes themes of cultural fluidity and globalization by restaging features characteristic of Nigerian houses and roadside retail stalls.”

Immediately upon seeing Njideka’s work, two fall 2013 collections came to mind – Junya Watanabe and Givenchy. First, Junya Watanabe’s on account of his always effortless mix of contrasting patterns and textures. Both Akunyili and Watanabe play with layering – Junya on the body and Njideka on a canvas – and often counterbalance extensive use of patterns with bold, bright, solid colors.

Junya Watanabe Fall/Winter 2013

Work by Njideka Akunyili

Junya Watanabe Fall/Winter 2013

Of Njideka’s work featured, I am most drawn to those that bare monochromatic qualities. Her two paintings below – one primarily red and one yellow – resemble two of the color stories Ricardo Tisci played with for fall. Both sets of looks and Njideka’s paintings get a majority of their depth through the mixing of complex patterns and a strong focus on a single color way. Can’t wait to see which runway looks are perfect compliments to her table design come Wednesday!

Work by Njideka Akunyili

Givenchy Fall/Winter 2013

Work by Njideka Akunyili

Givenchy Fall/Winter 2013

Bergdorf Goodman is the epitome of luxury, located on one of the busiest blocks in New York City and most iconic corners of any city in the world. When I was a young girl the first thing I would make my mom do each visit to New York was take me over to Bergdorf’s to see what the fantastical window displays had in store. Like the always-ornate windows sprawling the 5th Avenue storefront, Bergdorf’s is more than just about fashion. From a shopper’s perspective, no other retailer in New York, let alone the world, provides the same experience as one gets at Bergdorf Goodman. As a retailer, BG transports shoppers to a fashion wonderland that doesn’t feel like a store; take the homey-vibe of the second floor shoe salon or the BG restaurant on 7 that seems like a mere extension of your own dining room. Luckily, the retail powerhouse is now moving from its trademark location of the past 111 years and onto the big screen.

Iris Apfel in Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf’s

Karl Lagerfeld in Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf’s

Filmmaker Matthew Miele has been working on the documentary – appropriately entitled, Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf’s – for over two years. Over the course of several months Miele interviewed everyone from fashion legends such as Iris Apfel to actors, socialites and countless of Bergdorf’s top vendors – from established, international fashion gods like Karl Lagerfeld and Giorgio Armani to members of New York’s new guard such as Thakoon, the Proenza boys and the Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen. I saw a rough cut of the film in September but after six additional months of editing the completed piece is finally coming to New York theatres on May 3rd.

Thakoon in Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf’s

Jack and Lazaro of Proenza Schouler in Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf’s

My favorite storyline of the film has to be the piece centered around one of Bergdorf’s unstoppable forces who is fairly unknown by the public – senior director of visual presentation, David Hoey. Matthew was lucky enough to get full access to Hoey and his creative team as they spent months designing and prepping the install of Bergdorf’s 2011 Holiday Windows – dubbed Carnival of Animals. There is nothing like the day right around Thanksgiving when the purple curtains come down and the windows are revealed. Crowds of people gather all day in the freezing cold to get a glimpse of each window’s opulence. The excitement transports me back to my childhood when I would make visits to store and not even go inside. There is no doubt a similarly enthusiastic crowed will be gathered around theatres come the film’s release in less than one month!

Bergdorf Goodman 2011 Holiday Windows

Bergdorf Goodman 2011 Holiday Windows

Spring/Summer 2013 runway looks by Tom Ford, Gucci and Stella McCartney

The color that many recognize as cobalt is known formally in the art community as IKB (International Klein Blue) developed by French painter, Yves Klein. Klein first mixed the color, made up primarily of the blue pigment Ultramarine, at the start of his career and registered the unique shade as IKB in 1960. The color covered everything from sculptures and furniture to women’s bodies – Klein would often paint a female’s torso and lay them directly on his canvases (pictured below). Unfortunately, his time as a working artist was cut feverishly short due to a string of heart attacks in 1962, but nevertheless, his work made enough of a cultural impact in a few short years that the term IKB is still used today.

Yves Klein at work

Painting by Yves Klein

This season, the spring 2013 runways from New York to Paris saw pops of Klein’s iconic color. Beginning in New York, Joseph Altuzarra showed pieces accented with rich blue fabric while in London, Tom Ford used the same hue for two looks in his women’s presentation as did Antonio Berardi. In Milan, Gucci sent a collection of monochromatic looks down the runway, two of which were head-to-toe IKB. Finally in Paris, designers from Stella McCartney to Hermes and Elie Saab featured the iconic shade in their collections for spring.

Altuzarra – Spring/Summer 2013

Antonio Berardi – Spring/Summer 2013

Hermes – Spring/Summer 2013

Elie Saab – Spring/Summer 2013

The color made such a statement on the runway that Gucci even shot the two monochromatic IKB looks for their spring 2013 ad campaign. No woman can resist Klein.

Gucci Spring/Summer 2013 Campaign

Gucci Spring/Summer 2013 Campaign