The Struth Effect

The Struth Effect
Givenchy SS11 Couture

I love how Riccardo Tisci shows Givenchy Couture because Couture is an art that should be an intimate experience. Tisci first made the changeover from a traditional runway show to showing presentation-style for his fall 2010 collection. Each subsequent Couture collection has been shown in the same format and as the clothes get more exquisite each season so does how the collection is photographed. Nothing gets my heart racing quite like clicking through the front and back views of the tenth look of the presentation in anticipation of the concluding ‘family portrait’. Each season I find further similarities between this final portrait and the work of German photographer Thomas Struth.

Struth’s work is vast. He is best known for his museum photographs, in addition to his jungle series, cityscapes and family portraits. Each Givenchy Couture collection since fall 2010 has had a different hint of Struth; most notably, for fall 2012 Tisci staged the shoot with a Struth-like jungle backdrop. Now, after shooting portraits for the Queen of England and artist Gerhard Richter, it is about time for Struth to photograph a family all outfitted in straight-off-the-‘runway’ Givenchy Couture.

The Hirose Family, Hiroshima 1987 © Thomas Struth
The Hirose Family, Hiroshima 1987 © Thomas Struth

The Struth Effect
Givenchy FW10 Couture

Milan Cathedral, Milan 1998 © Thomas Struth
Milan Cathedral, Milan 1998 by © Thomas Struth

The Struth Effect
Givenchy FW11 Couture

Pergamon Museum 3, Berlin 2001 © Thomas Struth
Pergamon Museum 3, Berlin 2001 by © Thomas Struth

The Struth Effect
Givenchy FW12 Couture

Paradise 27, Rio Madre de Dios, Peru 2005 © Thomas Struth
Paradise 27, Rio Madre de Dios, Peru 2005 by © Thomas Struth

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  1. [...] may remember, HERE, when I compared Mr.Struth’s family portraits to the portraits shot at the end of Givenchy [...]



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