Fur Blocking

Yves Saint Laurnet’s Mondrian Dress from FW 1965 personifies the intersection between art and fashion. This grid-based print revolutionized the fashion world then and is still admired today – but really, how could you ever go wrong with a shift dress from the 60s? Similar to Saint Laurnet’s forward thinking, countless designer have taken on the task of reinventing a classic fur coat for fall using geometric shapes and bright colors.

While just a few seasons ago fashion houses were using patchwork as a way to lessen the amount of fur used for a garment, this season is all about unnecessary -but always welcome- excess. While Phoebe Philo used strips of fur as the main ingredient in adding cohesion to her Celine collection for Fall, Peter Pilotto relied on colorful fur to transform his summery dresses into cold weather material. Few things get me more excited than amazing coats for fall.

Drooling over these fur blocking pieces from Celine. I can’t seem to help but picture Snoop Dogg in the fuchsia and navy piece on the right…

Fur Blocking

Even Ms.Prada embraced the fur blocking trend in her recently shown Men’s SS13 collection…

Fur Blocking

Now, the even more exciting part. I was first introduced to the work of Richard Artschwager in October and immediately fell in love with his interpretation of sculpture. Just as countless designers have modernized a classic for fall, Artschwager reinvents simple shapes, like cubes and chairs, by way of colors and clean lines. His very contemporary take on furniture suggests him to be a modern day Lalanne – yet another source of inspiration for Mr.Saint Laurent. When I was scouring countless collections for examples of fur blocking, every piece I saw in some way reminded me of Artschwager’s work.

Artschwager’s cubes…

Fur Blocking

This is a fashion editorial begging to be done! Check out how even more major these Givenchy looks are alongside Artschwager’s tricolor chair. I really hope a publication with an insanely large budget does an Artschwager x fur blocking spread for fall!…

Fur Blocking

Sugimoto x Hermes I
Sugimoto x Hermes

Two very exciting fashion house-artist collaborations have been recently announced. The featured artists in both instances, Yayoi Kusama for Louis Vuitton and Hiroshi Sugimoto for Hermes, originally come from the Far East.

Marc Jacobs, arguably the most influential man in the fashion world, can be credited for introducing the works of various contemporary artists to the consumer market through luxury goods. In the past, Louis Vuitton has done large-scale collaborations with artists such as Stephen Sprouse, Takashi Murakami, and Richard Prince. Kusama, who has previously outfitted a Louis Vuitton bag in her trademark dots, as seen in the Marc Jacobs and Louis Vuitton documentary, will now transform an entire collection of clothing, accessories and leather goods with her endless spots – pictured below.

Kusama x LV II
Kusama x Louis Vuitton

Kusama x LV
Kusama x Louis Vuitton

Not only do Marc’s collaborations excite both the fashion world and consumers, they are in turn inspirational to fellow artists. Take street artist Zevs, who applied his drip technique to Murakami’s Louis Vuitton logo design for his Liquidated Version show in 2011…

Photographer Luis Gispert also used two of Jacobs’ previous LV collaborations – Stephen Sprouse and Takashi Murakami – in his Decepción series of pimped-out car interiors…

Gispert Sprouse
Stephen Sprouse x Louis Vuitton interior

Gispert Murakami
Takashi Murakami x Louis Vuitton interior

Comparisons to Murakami’s work can even be made when looking at Kusama’s rainbow dot series…

Kusama Rainbow

I look forward to passing endless rows of street vendors in the city later this summer to see Kusama’s dotted bags scattered amongst other LV monograms. The first of Kusama’s capsule collections for Louis Vuitton is set to hit stores on July 10 and the second, of primarily leather goods, will be available in October.

Sugimoto x Hermes II
Hiroshi Sugimoto x Hermes

More recently than the Kusama collaboration, Hermes announced an exciting partnership with Japanese photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto. Sugimoto is famous for his colorful Polaroids which Hermes will print on large silk scarves. While one typically associates scarves with keeping you warm in the cold winter months, Hermes’ decision to market the pieces as art as opposed to fashion is a smart one, considering they’re said to retail for just shy of $9,000. The collection of 20 different images will be called Colors of Shadows and are part of the Hermes Editeur series.

Sugimoto x Hermes III

I especially love Sugimoto’s images because they look like modernized versions of works by one of my favorite artists, Mark Rothko.

Mark Rothko
Mark Rothko’s White Center (Yellow, Pink and Lavender on Rose) – 1950

The Art of Shopping

I’ve decided to start a category within Minnie Muse called The Art of… as yet another way to share some musings concerning everything art and fashion; and what better a time to launch than now that Spring 12 sale season has begun. Sure, there are some basic shopping tips that every one, even online shopping armatures, should know – such as taking advantage of sites like Polyvore and ShopStyle come sale time– but there is one trick that I discovered that revolutionized internet shopping for me.

When looking back on my quest in Spring 2010 to try and track down Alexander Wang’s much-coveted cheetah wedges, I realize how tricky the Internet can be. I remember finding the spotted pieces of perfection on Barneys.com during English class one morning. Within minutes the shoes were sold out and the light at the end of the football-dome shaped tunnel (keeping with the theme of Wang’s SS10 show) was slowly fading. That story has a happy ending but I was put in a similar situation this past January when finding my dream belt by Isabel Marant on Net-a-Porter. It was a few days into the start of the sale and my size was already gone. Although I was checking daily to see if anyone had made a return, nothing had changed. It wasn’t until my trip to Europe later in the month that the belt became mine. When I logged on to the Internet in Paris to check Net-a-Porter, unbeknownst to me, my computer recognized I was over seas and thus connected me to the European Net-a-Porter site. Not only did I find my belt in the correct size, but a few other key pieces that had been sold out in the states for weeks. What a simple change that could, and did, make all the difference.

Since then I have been making sure to check on occasion to see if they carry anything major in Europe that wasn’t bought for – or is available in – the states. Now that sale time has commenced on both the US and International site, I thought it time to share my little trick with my readers. There are still plenty of pieces of perfection available here and in the newly launched European sale on Net-a-Porter, so act fast and happy shopping.

Here is a quick tutorial on how to change your location:
Begin by signing into you account and clicking on your current location in the upper left hand corner…

The Art of Shopping

Click on the International Site drop down menu…

The Art of Shopping

Choose your country and begin browsing…

The Art of Shopping

Sammlung Boros

One of my favorite memories from our recent trip to Berlin was visiting the Sammlung Boros. The Sammlung Boros is an old Bunker turned private home and gallery. After being built in the early 1940s as a safe house, the building took on many roles – going from a prison, to banana storage, to a rave club in the early 90s – before being purchased in 2003 by art collector Christian Boros. There are still a few bunkers scattered around the city that are now either privately owned or up for sale. It was quite jarring to turn the corner and run into such an intimidating structure amidst the many quaint, surrounding buildings.

After acquiring the bunker, Boros spent four years renovating the inside and constructing a modern home atop the building. Now, Boros lives with his family in the penthouse and uses the stories below to house his insanely major art collection. The private gallery is open for viewing by appointment only. We were lucky enough to get a tour during our visit by our new best friend and manager of the Sammlung Boros, Hans.

The portion of Boros’ collection we saw was curated to compliment and highlight the space. These pieces – primarily sculpture and light installations – have been up for four years and will be taken down this summer to make way for a new group of work from Boros’ collection to be on view. It is exciting to know that during my next visit to Berlin I will be able to see entirely new art on display, however upsetting as a few of the works were created uniquely for the space and thus will be destroyed during the changeover. Oh well, if only I too could hire Anslem Reyle to come paint on my walls only to cover up his work a few years later. Maybe someday…

Doors from the original bunker.

Sammlung Boros

A set of photographs of the space taken just after its time as a club and prior to Boros’ renovation.

Sammlung Boros

Christian Boros has the largest, privately-owned Olafur Eliasson collections in the world, so it was quite appropriate that Eliasson’s fabulous disco ball-esq glass piece is the first major work to greet visitors.

Olafur Eliasson

This room was originally two separate stories but Boros had to break through the floor/ceiling to accommodate these two amazing works by Anselm Reyle.

Anselm Reyle

Light installation by Anselm Reyle.

Anselm Reyle

Custom work by Anselm Reyle.

Anselm Reyle

Some Anselm Reyle disco hay.

Anselm Reyle

Leave it to Elmgreen and Dragset to create this terrifyingly realistic hospital scene.

Elmgreen and Dragset

Work by Anselm Reyle.

Anselm Reyle

Olafur Eliasson’s DNA.

Olafur Eliasson

Kitty Kraus’ light boxes.

Kitty Kraus

Work by Robert Kusmirowski.

Robert Kusmirowski

An Olafur Eliasson installation. When the fan is on, depending on where you stand in the room it alters its rotation, sometimes leading to collisions with the walls.

Olafur Eliasson

I do not recall this artist’s name, however there is an very interesting story behind this piece. The point of the work is to prove how corrupt the art world is. The artist invited individuals to a gallery show in an empty gallery. It turned out very few people realized there was actually no work on display, they just saw the invitation as an excuse to party. The artist then used trash from this ‘party’ – such as the bottles below – to construct works for his show.

Sammlung Boros

This work by Santiago Sierra was another installation made uniquely for the space. Sierra is famous for his ‘permanent’ works often highlighting corruption and poverty, thus it is appropriate that in order to fit the four structures pictured below, Boros needed to modify the physical makeup of the bunker.

Santiago Sierra

Work by Sarah Lucas.

Sarah Lucas

Work by Bojan Sarcevic.

Bojan Sarcevic

Wall by Tobias Rehberger.

Tobias Rehberger

This unknown artist did a series of twelve vases all representing twelve of his closest fellow artist friends – the vase below is Elizabeth Peyton. The owner of each vase must sign a contract upon purchasing the work that they will always keep the depicted artist’s favorite flowers fresh in the vase – Peyton’s happen to be Gerbera Daisies.

Sammlung Boros

Work by Manfred Pernice.

Manfred Pernice

Hans amongst a few Tobias Rehberger lamps.

Tobias Rehberger

More lamps by Tobias Rehberger.

Tobias Rehberger

A portrait by Tobias Rehberger.

Tobias Rehberger

Final piece; a skull by Kris Martin.

Kris Martin

AlBear Elbaz

Happy Birthday to one of my all time favorite designers and people, Alber Elbaz. Alber is one of the kindest, most generous people I know and in honor of the Lanvin designer’s birthday I took one of my animals – after countless hours of pattern making and sewing – and AlBear-ified him; bow tie and all! Doesn’t he make the cutest teddy bear?? Take note Lanvin!

LBJ

Wednesday evening marked the opening of the Little Black Jacket exhibit in SoHo. The book, which will not be available until late August, is in essence a picture book for fashion-minded adults. The 100 portraits inside were shot by Karl Lagerfeld and styled by Carine Roitfeld from May-October of 2011 in three different cities – Monaco, Paris and New York. Despite a very high demand, the actual jacket used in the photos, which was from Chanel’s Resort 2012 collection, will not be available for purchase. Three iconic images from the show – Vanessa Paradis, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Elle Fanning – are available as posters free of change for visitors to take and use in anticipation of the book’s publication. The traveling show will run in New York through Friday, June 15th at the Swiss Institute gallery space at 18 Wooster Street in SoHo.

LBJ

LBJ

Olivier Theyskens

LBJ

Poppy Delevigne

LBJ

LBJ

Posters

LBJ

LBJ

With Alexander Wang

LBJ

Peter Marino

LBJ

Michelle Harper

LBJ

LBJ

LBJ

LBJ

At Work

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At Work

There is nothing like the inspiration that comes from seeing an artist at work. Art & Toys brought out some of today’s top street artists to Berlin not only to show their support, but to create one of a kind works in honor of the show. You were briefly introduced to a few of Buff Monster‘s and Pete Fowler‘s pieces in my previous post, but take a look below to see them at work.

Pete Fowler

At Work

The pattern on the sculpture that Pete is woking on was done completely freehand with no stencil. Fowler mixes his paint entirely by hand and uses a fine bristle brush.

At Work

At Work

At Work

At Work

At Work

Buff Monster

At Work

I am a huge fan of Buff Monster and even have one of his pieces, bought at Art Basel, hanging in my bedroom. It is always exciting to meet artists, much less one who’s work I wake up to each morning. He typically paints on a canvas but chose to spray in honor of the event. You can check out how the final piece turned out on his site.

At Work

At Work

At Work

At Work